Old Tales in New Clothes: Once upon the Internet

I’ve been super MIA from this blog during the pandemic, but not because I haven’t been busy!

This post from Once upon a Blog came at just the right time; I’m working a lot with fairy tale retellings again, and here we have some fun re-contextualizations of popular fairy tales for modern times. Click on the pic to read it!

File Under: Things That Make Me Embarrassed to Be a White Woman



Halle Bailey is to be Disney’s newest princess as Ariel in the upcoming Disney live-action “The Little Mermaid”

“It was abundantly clear that Halle possesses that rare combination of spirit, heart, youth, innocence, and substance — plus a glorious singing voice — all intrinsic qualities necessary to play this iconic role,” said (Director Rob) Marshall.

Exactly what Disney’s live-action Little Mermaid needs to be – right?

Read more.

(Source: Once upon A Blog)

Cinderella: Stop Blaming the Victim – A Timely Interpretation of Disney’s 1950’s ‘Cinderella’

A thought-provoking video was posted this morning on YouTube and we felt it so important, we decided to do a full post, rather than just retweeting. (Video is embedded below.)

This interesting  – and wonderful – analysis of the iconic 1950’s Cinderella, couldn’t have come at a more opportune time. And it might just make you pull out the movie for a re-run too, because, yes, it’s that empowering.

By the way – important to note here, is that it mentions that even the Disney Company itself, now considers the Cinderella animated movie as passive, and not the best role-model for girls, with the title character relying on others to be rescued….

Read more here.

(Source: Once Upon a Blog)

Coming Soon: FOREST SECLUSION

These five fairy tales feature LGBTQ characters, many of whom begin life in castles, yet make their way into the wild forests for love, truth, and a sense of themselves. This free anthology takes the classics and makes them ours.

White Deer by Jess Martin – Curses, shape-shifting, and shrimp fairies: welcome to Jenn’s version of Madame d’Aulnoy’s fairy tale where she gender-bends the cursed creation, takes liberty with the hero’s tale, and finds a princess who isn’t in a rush to get rescued.

Snow White by Christina Rosso – When Snow White’s father brings home Nadene, her new step-mother, the princess has doubts about the girl’s ability to be a queen and mother, but what Snow White never expects is to fall in love with her.

The Tree of Wisdom by Dale Cameron Lowry – A curse cast on Prince Florian makes love a dangerous enterprise. But when he meets animal whisperer Olvir, he falls willingly.

If Only You Were Someone Else by Jennifer Loring – A changeling is willing to risk everything to discover who and what s/he really is–especially when s/he falls for a human male.

Heaven Scent by Chantal Boudreau – A highly sensual retelling of Rapunzel from an insider’s perspective.

Coming Soon from Supposed Crimes.

Prison Made of Mirrors Release Day!

Aithne is a warrior kidnapped from her homeland during a Viking invasion and forced to marry her captor. Shortly before the raid that claims his life, she becomes pregnant with a child whom she believes cursed. Spurred by the dark sorcery she learns from relics her late husband’s mother left behind—including a magic mirror—Aithne descends into a madness that threatens not only her child’s life but also the lives of everyone around her.

Exiled by her mother, Brenna is taken in by a clan of dwarves who treat her like their own. They soon learn that no one is immune to Aithne’s lunacy—not even the prince to whom Brenna was once betrothed. Brenna must face and conquer death itself if she is to save the land that rightfully belongs to her, and to break her mother’s terrible spell on the man she loves.

Purchase the eBook from Amazon or Barnes and Noble. Paperback available through CreateSpace.

Now Available for Pre-order: Prison Made of Mirrors

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Aithne is a warrior kidnapped from her homeland during a Viking invasion and forced to marry her captor. Shortly before the raid that claims his life, she becomes pregnant with a child whom she believes cursed. Spurred by the dark sorcery she learns from relics her late husband’s mother left behind—including a magic mirror—Aithne descends into a madness that threatens not only her child’s life but also the lives of everyone around her.

Exiled by her mother, Brenna is taken in by a clan of dwarves who treat her like their own. They soon learn that no one is immune to Aithne’s lunacy—not even the prince to whom Brenna was once betrothed. Brenna must face and conquer death itself if she is to save the land that rightfully belongs to her, and to break her mother’s terrible spell on the man she loves.

Pre-order for $2.99 at Amazon. Print version coming soon!

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5 Things Writers Can Learn From Reading Fairy Tales – Writer’s Edit

The simple structure, clear elements, and unadorned style of fairy tales are something all writers can learn from. After all, fairy tales have passed the test of time. They engage readers (or listeners) exactly because their simplicity makes for dynamic (and dramatic!) stories. Regardless of what genre you write, here are the top five things writers can learn from reading fairy tales.

1. Craft a strong beginning

The classic ‘Once upon a time…’ story beginning immediately creates a connection with readers. It is familiar, while at the same time promising a new adventure. These are four magical words for kids, and for many adults. And that’s the point right there: the beginning of your story should be magical. A strong beginning should:

Convey a sense of atmosphere (giving a clue to the genre and style of your story)

Establish the setting

Either…

Source: 5 Things Writers Can Learn From Reading Fairy Tales – Writer’s Edit