advice

All posts tagged advice

7 Useful Tips For Establishing A Writing Routine – Writer’s Edit

Published March 21, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

There are certain things all writers need: inspiration, creativity, dedication, some measure of talent. But there’s one thing that’s perhaps more important than all these elements combined – one thing that’s guaranteed to help you become a productive, prolific writer. And that thing is a writing routine. Every writer who wants to achieve their goals must have a writing routine. Without a routine, it’s all too easy to fall into the trap of procrastination, or to disappoint yourself when your writing output isn’t where you want it to be. Without a routine, it’s hard to make writing a regular habit – and making it a habit is something you must do if you ever want to finish that novel! Like most things in life, there’s no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution here. Every writer works differently and has different strengths and weaknesses…

Source: 7 Useful Tips For Establishing A Writing Routine – Writer’s Edit

Impostor Syndrome: What Is It And How Can Writers Overcome It? – Writer’s Edit

Published March 8, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

Have the words ‘I’m not a real writer’ ever crossed your mind? Have you ever felt that your writing skills are inadequate, despite evidence to the contrary? Have you ever achieved success with your writing, only to think, ‘How did I get here/I don’t know what I’m doing/I don’t deserve this’? If any of the above rings true, you may be struggling with something called impostor syndrome. What is impostor syndrome? First identified by clinical psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes in 1978, impostor syndrome refers to feelings of fraud and self-doubt experienced mainly by high-achieving individuals. These individuals are convinced that they are not really knowledgeable, skilled or talented in their area of expertise – that they have somehow fooled people, scammed their way to success, and will be exposed sooner or later as the fraud they really are.

Source: Impostor Syndrome: What Is It And How Can Writers Overcome It? – Writer’s Edit

5 Things Writers Can Learn From Reading Fairy Tales – Writer’s Edit

Published February 2, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

The simple structure, clear elements, and unadorned style of fairy tales are something all writers can learn from. After all, fairy tales have passed the test of time. They engage readers (or listeners) exactly because their simplicity makes for dynamic (and dramatic!) stories. Regardless of what genre you write, here are the top five things writers can learn from reading fairy tales.

1. Craft a strong beginning

The classic ‘Once upon a time…’ story beginning immediately creates a connection with readers. It is familiar, while at the same time promising a new adventure. These are four magical words for kids, and for many adults. And that’s the point right there: the beginning of your story should be magical. A strong beginning should:

Convey a sense of atmosphere (giving a clue to the genre and style of your story)

Establish the setting

Either…

Source: 5 Things Writers Can Learn From Reading Fairy Tales – Writer’s Edit

7 Key Elements To Include In Your First Chapter – Writer’s Edit

Published January 26, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

The importance of your novel’s first chapter cannot be underestimated. It’s the chapter that introduces your book to the world – the chapter that needs to draw in agents and publishers and readers alike. (No pressure or anything!) Unfortunately, there’s no predetermined formula for a perfect first chapter. Every story is different, and so is every opening chapter. However, there are certain elements that most successful first chapters share, and it’s those that should serve as guidelines to you when you’re writing the opening of your book. Virtually nobody is able to knock out a flawless first chapter on their first draft. You may need to come back and include some of these elements during your rewrite or edit. But even if you haven’t started writing yet, it’s worth keeping the following things in mind to ensure you’re on the right track.

Source: 7 Key Elements To Include In Your First Chapter – Writer’s Edit

9 Simple Ways To Sharpen Your Manuscript – Writer’s Edit

Published January 18, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

When you’ve finally finished your manuscript after thousands of hours of work, the last thing you want to hear is that there’s more work to be done. But unfortunately, that’s the simple truth of the matter. Finalising your draft is an enormous achievement, but now’s not the time to rest on your laurels! There’s still a lot you need to do to get your book ready for publication. Once you’ve written, rewritten and edited and you’re satisfied with the story, it’s time to focus on the little things: the small yet important details of the writing itself. Despite (or perhaps because of) the hundreds of times you’ve read your manuscript, there are plenty of things you might have missed. Overused or unnecessary words; inelegant phrasing or exposition; long, difficult-to-read sentences… All of these things might have escaped your notice while you were dealing with bigger…

Source: 9 Simple Ways To Sharpen Your Manuscript – Writer’s Edit

7 Common Mistakes To Avoid In Your First Chapter – Writer’s Edit

Published January 10, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

Recently, we delved into what makes a great opener for a novel, covering the key elements to include in your first chapter. But just as there are important elements you should aim to include, there are also elements you should strive to avoid. As we discussed previously, your first chapter has the power to make or break your novel in the eyes of readers, agents and editors alike. Clichés, weak writing, gluts of information, misplaced scenes – all these things have the potential to drive away your audience.  For most authors, it’s fairly easy to fall into the trap of any of the following undesirable elements. Mistakes are completely understandable, especially when you’re only on your first draft. But if you keep the following tips in mind while you…

Source: 7 Common Mistakes To Avoid In Your First Chapter – Writer’s Edit

6 Quick Tips For Writing Gripping Scenes – Writer’s Edit

Published December 13, 2016 by Jennifer Loring

Scenes drive your story forward; without them, there would be no novel. Your scenes need to keep your reader on the edge of their seat with your plot and characters because otherwise, they won’t keep reading. Looking at your novel on a scene-by-scene basis is a critical step in the writing and editing process. Here’s a list of six things you can do to make every scene super engaging for your readers.

1. Structure your scenes to maintain good pacing You’re probably aware of the importance of structuring your novel, but having good scene structure is equally important. By structuring your scenes carefully, you will ensure your novel maintains a good pace and isn’t full of dull patches.

In his book Techniques of the Selling Writer, author Dwight V. Swain highlights the importance of creating scenes and sequels. He suggests that a scene should always be

Source: 6 Quick Tips For Writing Gripping Scenes – Writer’s Edit

4 Signs It’s Time To Quit A Writing Project – Writer’s Edit

Published November 22, 2016 by Jennifer Loring

There is a romantic myth that surrounds writers. This myth is rife with infatuation, possessiveness and protectiveness: a writer is supposed to be obsessed with their work. Utterly absorbed. If their creative process stalls, or in some instances flatlines, the writer should just work harder. More rewrites, more experimentation. They should even put the draft away to gain that invaluable perspective, but ultimately come back. No matter the grief a project causes, a writer should always come back. It reads like a lover addicted to an implosive partnership. Romantic myth, prepare to be busted. Just like relationships, not all projects are meant to last forever. Some projects might not last a week. A day. A five minute type-out. Some projects you don’t have to come back for. And that’s okay. In fact, that’s healthy. Similar to a relationship that limps on well…

Source: 4 Signs It’s Time To Quit A Writing Project – Writer’s Edit

5 Everyday Book Marketing Tips For Authors – Writer’s Edit

Published October 17, 2016 by Jennifer Loring

As I often tell authors, the good news about book promotion is the same as the bad news: There’s always something more you can be doing for your book. This means that, on one hand, you always have the opportunity to reach new readers, no matter how long your book has been out in the world; your book can’t be “old” to someone who hasn’t yet discovered it. On the other hand, you can spend so much time on book promotion that you can risk neglecting what got you to this point in the first place: writing. So the question becomes how to balance it all – and this is where the idea of everyday book marketing comes in. By thinking of promotional opportunities as part of your everyday life, you can continue to promote your book in ways that…

Source: 5 Everyday Book Marketing Tips For Authors – Writer’s Edit

6 Questions To Help You Avoid Predatory Publishers – Writer’s Edit

Published October 4, 2016 by Jennifer Loring

For many writers, publication can seem like the ultimate prize. Many anticipate the wondrous moment when a publisher will finally say “yes” – launching their careers and justifying years of hard labour. But the publishing industry, like all industries, does have a few predators, which budding writers would do best to avoid. These “publishers” may not actually publish books at all. Or they may publish and sell books, but trap inexperienced writers in unfavourable contracts. It is important that new writers enter the industry with eyes open, and know what questions to ask. In this article, we’ll delve into the facts and questions that will help writers spot predatory “publishers” and/or predatory contracts. Before we dive in, let’s take a refresher course on the different publishing models that exist today. Models of publishing While the publishing model alone is

Source: 6 Questions To Help You Avoid Predatory Publishers – Writer’s Edit

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