fairy tales

All posts tagged fairy tales

Coming Soon: FOREST SECLUSION

Published March 26, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

These five fairy tales feature LGBTQ characters, many of whom begin life in castles, yet make their way into the wild forests for love, truth, and a sense of themselves. This free anthology takes the classics and makes them ours.

White Deer by Jess Martin – Curses, shape-shifting, and shrimp fairies: welcome to Jenn’s version of Madame d’Aulnoy’s fairy tale where she gender-bends the cursed creation, takes liberty with the hero’s tale, and finds a princess who isn’t in a rush to get rescued.

Snow White by Christina Rosso – When Snow White’s father brings home Nadene, her new step-mother, the princess has doubts about the girl’s ability to be a queen and mother, but what Snow White never expects is to fall in love with her.

The Tree of Wisdom by Dale Cameron Lowry – A curse cast on Prince Florian makes love a dangerous enterprise. But when he meets animal whisperer Olvir, he falls willingly.

If Only You Were Someone Else by Jennifer Loring – A changeling is willing to risk everything to discover who and what s/he really is–especially when s/he falls for a human male.

Heaven Scent by Chantal Boudreau – A highly sensual retelling of Rapunzel from an insider’s perspective.

Coming Soon from Supposed Crimes.

5 Things Writers Can Learn From Reading Fairy Tales – Writer’s Edit

Published February 2, 2017 by Jennifer Loring

The simple structure, clear elements, and unadorned style of fairy tales are something all writers can learn from. After all, fairy tales have passed the test of time. They engage readers (or listeners) exactly because their simplicity makes for dynamic (and dramatic!) stories. Regardless of what genre you write, here are the top five things writers can learn from reading fairy tales.

1. Craft a strong beginning

The classic ‘Once upon a time…’ story beginning immediately creates a connection with readers. It is familiar, while at the same time promising a new adventure. These are four magical words for kids, and for many adults. And that’s the point right there: the beginning of your story should be magical. A strong beginning should:

Convey a sense of atmosphere (giving a clue to the genre and style of your story)

Establish the setting

Either…

Source: 5 Things Writers Can Learn From Reading Fairy Tales – Writer’s Edit

Grimm and Grimmer Volume Two

Published April 11, 2013 by Jennifer Loring

GGvolumetwo From Amazon.com’s description: “In the second volume of our Grimm and Grimmer series of retold fairy tales, we present six new or established writers who bring together a collection of tasty treats.
Reading the original tales, you realise how many of those tales were simple lessons about behaviour and survival. Some were lessons we could still agree with; be kind to those who seem poor and dirty and powerless. Behave pleasantly to those around you. Keep your eyes open. Note what happens to others who have gone on this quest before you. Be brave. Be crafty.
In this anthology our six tales present alternate versions of these lessons. In Matthew Sylvester’s Death’s Messengers, a futuristic soldier makes a choice that extends his life. In Ed Ahern’s Happily Ever After, the stereotypes of Prince and Princess are subverted, just as ‘One Hundred Lost Years’ by Jennifer Loring teaches us not to judge a book by its cover. In Ready or Not by Nancy Brashear, we see a dark version of Hansel and Gretel, whilst Paved with Gold by Ed Fortune, shows us that all that glitters is not gold. And in Stewart Hotston’s Rumpeltrollskin, the lesson is . . beware a fool’s bargain. So step in and enjoy these brand new twisted fairy tales.”

The paperback version will be out soon, but you can grab the Kindle edition now for only $2.99!

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